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Need help taming that feisty canine of yours? Perhaps you want to train Fido to fetch your favorite beverage from the fridge? Then check out the wide variety of dog trainers who belong to this community.
 

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Pitbull Potty Training - 10/14/2013

To potty train a Pitbull puppy, is not an easy job! Having said that, it is very important that you should start potty training your puppy when it is around 10-12 weeks old. Potty training can be very frustrating, cumbersome and very annoying at times. Most of the pitbull owners fail to train their puppies effectively and gradually the pitbull grows up without proper guidance. As a pitbull owner, you are entitled to some responsibilities against your puppy. Below are the basic instructions you may need to follow in training your pitbull.

Pitbull Potty Training





An Exercise on Sound Bias - 06/14/2013
Bias: Sound (music, dubbed sounds and verbals) can change how we perceive a behavior or event. Watch this short video without sound first. Write down your overall perception of the puppies. Watch video Then watch it again with sound. Write down your overall perspective. Has it changed? This is why I usually watch any video footage with the sound turned off first, then add it back in as background context. (And is also a good lesson on how editing can make things seem what they aren't.) (even the title adds bias!) Enjoy!

An Exercise on Sound Bias




Qualitative Observations vs Quantitative Observations - 05/17/2013
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Qualitative Observations vs Quantitative Observations




Interpretation: How to Figure Out What a Behavior Means? - 02/26/2013
96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} How to Figure Out What a Behavior Means? You observe your dog doing a behavior. You are unsure what the behavior means. How do you figure out what it means? For ethologists (zoologists who study behaviors of a single species of animal under natural conditions), it’s a process of: * looking at the behavior itself  * other behaviors that commonly accompany that behavior * the trigger (stimulus) for the behavior (medical, physical, social, environmental, emotional etc) * the response of other dogs to that behavior *if the behavior has a function in the social structure a dog lives in * the physical environment the dog is in * the recent history of the physical location etc.  It is also a function of observing that dog doing the behavior at many different times and environments so you can watch for a pattern of that behavior.  Added to that is observation to see if that behavior is shared by other dogs, under which of the above circumstances do they do it and if so, how common is it? Recording What You Observe: Even more helpful than relying on memor...

Interpretation: How to Figure Out What a Behavior Means?




Biases and Filters - 02/24/2013
Bias and Filters A bias is when we look at something and our background knowledge and experience acts like a filter that we use to see the world with. Ideally, we want to be aware of our biases and remove them to the degree that is possible. Of course, it is not possible to remove all bias, so all observations are inherently biased, even if we think we are being as objective as we can and are not using any filters.  There are at least three kinds of biases: 'Confirmational bias' is when our observations support what we expect to see. We may unconsciously filter out what does not support our bias. Take dominance for example. One person looks at a dog’s behavior and see a dog trying to be dominant. Another sees a dog offering an appeasing behavior. The behavior is the same, the bias is different. 'Cargo cult bias' is when we see what we want to see. If we focus only on one thing, we miss others, such as in the basketball passing video. Peer review can help, but only if the whole population does not have the same bias. 'Processing bias' is when the technology we create to do the measuring/observing adds a bias. All technology has the same bias as the person creating it. All this is to say that even without knowing it, each person bias their observations. 1. If someone is looking at dog behavior with a strong filter that dogs do not have a language, which type of bias would this be?   2. What if a person has a bias that a dog is an aggressive dog? (answers below acti...

Biases and Filters




Unusual Signs of Stress in Dogs - 02/23/2013
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Unusual Signs of Stress in Dogs




Stress and Dogs - 02/23/2013
96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} Stress and Dogs What is stress? ‘Stress is a lack of fit between the perceived demands of the environment and the perceived ability to cope with those demands.’ According to “The Primary Headship” Apr 2007.   It occurs in dogs as well as humans. Di-stress There are two types of stress. When they hear the word ‘stress’, most people think of the negative kind of stress, called ‘DIstress’. And example would be if a dog is fearful about a situation, a dog in a panic or in pain. Most dogs that have been subjected to punishment-based training exhibit signs of distress in their daily lives. You don’t have to look far for examples of those behaviors. Here’s a link that lists behaviors related to pain and distress.  http://www.epettalk.com/forums/showthread.php?59883-Signs-of-pain-and-distress-in-dogs Eu-stress There is also good stress called ‘EUstress’. It can be healthy, pleasureable or curative. Eustress has a perceived positive outcome. An example of this would be excitement of meeting a person or pleasure of figuring out a puzzle du...

Stress and Dogs




Stress and Calming Signals - 02/22/2013
96 800x600 Normal 0 false false false EN-US JA X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman";} A fundamental tool in dog training is knowing how to read your dog’s body language. Since stress is a big factor in many interactions and behavior, it pays to know some signs of stress. Typical signs of stress for a dog include yawning, looking away, lip licking, scratching, whale eye, curving on approach etc. They can also be considered “calming signals” since scientists believe the intent might be to calm the dog herself as well as the other dog, person or animal. Turid Rugass was the pioneer of this idea and she has published several photos that appear in her book at this link. http://www.canis.no/rugaas/gallery.php She also has a video out as well: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lj7BWxC6iVs (I personally would substitute the word “social” for ‘pack’ since I not believe they live in a pack, but are social with other dogs, both related and unrelated. ACTIVITY: Observe your dog(s) for the next week or so and see in what situations your dog uses these calming signals.  Some examples: with adults, with other dogs, with children, in a strange env...

Stress and Calming Signals



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